• Size

    50,000 SF

  • Stories

    1

  • Use

    Education

  • Year Completed

    2017

  • Project Value

    $1.1 Million

  • Recognition

    Flexibility & Space for Growth

Autism Services, Inc. – 30 & 40 Hazelwood Dr. Amherst, NY 14228

Client Objective – Locate and create a new facility and environment

Autism Services, Inc. provides educational programs and support services for children and
adults with autism and their families. In 2016, the nonprofit agency sought an enhanced and consolidated school and administration space in a new location. Previously operating from separate education and office locations in Clarence, N.Y., they envisioned a new school facility and administrative offices.

Solutions – Locating and creating a site that fosters learning and support

Uniland identified adjacent buildings at Audubon Business Centre in nearby Amherst: 30 Hazelwood Drive for a new school and 40 Hazelwood Drive for offices. The site is conveniently located for their clients. Uniland collaborated with the staff to learn about their special needs and customized a combined 50,000 square feet.

Special features at the school include:
• Special sensory lighting throughout the facility,
• Vivid colors and patterns serving as key markers and way finders
• 12 spacious classrooms
• A gymnasium–the organization’s first,
• Rooms for art, speech therapy, and occupational therapy,
• Kitchen and laundry facilities to teach students related skills,
• A large break room, and
• A teachers’ lounge

Reuslts

Autism Services can now support students, their families, and their staff with facilities that
foster growth in a purpose-built, welcoming environment.

Reflecting on the new school, Veronica Federiconi, CEO of Autism Services, Inc. says, “I’ve been wanting our students, staff and teachers to have a school that supports our philosophy and values and is sensitive to the needs and interests of students with autism, and after a thorough search, this site was the best fit for us. Uniland has been extremely patient and tolerant of all the questions and changes. They were so accepting and open. They had to learn about our population and understand why we needed certain things. They were just wonderful.”